Date: 21st September 2019 at 9:27am
Written by:

Chris Sutton has hit back at the critics- led by Neil McCann- who have slammed Rennes for their performance against Celtic.

Rather than praise a Scottish club that had matched and drawn with the side in second place in the French League the former Dundee boss claimed that Rennes were ‘poor in possession’ and ‘sloppy’.

Perhaps the way that Celtic played knocked Rennes out of their stride with the tactics of Neil Lennon forcing the French side out of their normal game.

The 1-1 draw gives Celtic a near perfect start to their Europa League campaign thanks to a performance that took the game to their opponents rather than parking the bus and hoping to snatch a goal on the counter attack.

In the Daily Record Sutton hit out:

I heard one or two people saying Rennes weren’t up to much, but that’s typical when Celtic get a result away from home. Too often in these situations, folk want to look at the failings of the opposition instead of dishing out some credit to Celtic and that’s unfair.

This is a team who are second in Ligue 1 and have beaten Paris Saint Germain the other week in a stadium with a big atmosphere. The same PSG who hammered Real Madrid in midweek. That gives some perspective to Celtic’s performance.

After the match McCann explained to Radio Scotland listeners:

I wonder if Celtic would have preferred Lazio to have taken care of Cluj because Cluj beating the top side has certainly opened the group up.

Later, still upset, he added:

As much as we were saying Rennes are a good side, I wasn’t impressed with them tonight at all. They were poor in possession. They tried to play from the back and were sloppy. They gave it away a lot and didn’t really threaten Celtic. Celtic look like they had better footballers on the pitch.

As manager of Dundee McCann lost 34 out of 65 games played. Since losing his job managing Dundee last season McCann seems to have slotted in to the team of pundits at Radio Scotland including Billy Dodds, Alex Rae, Kris Boyd and Steven Thompson.