Date: 27th July 2013 at 10:19pm
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Charlotte Fakeovers has published an alleged invoice that shows how BBC policy can be bought and paid for.

The anonymous twitter account has turned its attention in recent weeks to the activities of the PR company Media House who included Rangers among their clients.

Charlotte appears to have almost unlimited access to documentation involving various parties involved with the Ibrox club in recent times.

The latest document published online details the May 2011 invoice from Media House to the football club- the month in which former billionaire Craig Whyte bought the club for £1.

Naturally painting Whyte in the best possible light was a priority for the PR firm but for reasons unknown the club was invoiced for a ‘Call to the BBC to define pro-IRA songs’ on May 16.

Five days later, having ignored the issue of contentious by supporters at the League Cup Final between Celtic and Rangers in March, BBC anchor-man Rob MacLean decided to accuse Celtic fans of singing sectarian songs at the Scottish Cup Final with Motherwell.

Using a favoured old tactic McLean changed the conversation from football with Craig Levein to reveal: “I’d love to go through a football show without having to mention the word sectarian but at half time I feel that I am going to have to because those outside who can hear the songs being sung have been telling me that the Celtic supporters have been singing sectarian songs during the first half despite Celtic going very public with their intimation that they want it completely stamped out.”

The BBC received a number of complaints about that issue from Celtic fans.

Answering the complaints in a standard email they claimed that “five editions of Sportscene in April and May took time to debate the issue in relation to the general problem and to specific incidents such as the sending of parcel bombs and the fining of Rangers FC by UEFA.”

Part of the BBC Scotland reply read: “At the half time interval of our live television broadcast of this year’s Scottish Cup Final the presenter and one of the guests briefly mentioned that sectarian singing had been heard coming from a minority of Celtic fans.

“Given the incidents of recent weeks, and taking into account the statement by Neil Lennon posted on the club’s official website just days before the Final, it was editorially appropriate to include this short discussion.

“Sectarianism and associated behaviours have been the topic of much comment this season and five editions of Sportscene in April and May took time to debate the issue in relation to the general problem and to specific incidents such as the sending of parcel bombs and the fining of Rangers FC by UEFA.

“There is a continuing debate around the definition of “sectarian” and we accept that it would have been more accurate for our presenter to refer to “songs that some people believe to be an expression of sectarianism but which many people nonetheless find both offensive and provocative”.

Unless BBC Scotland comes out to explain their change in policy, and the source of the complaints at the 2011 Scottish Cup Final, it will appear that the state broadcaster is there to be influenced by PR companies.

If BBC Scotland decide to ignore the claims of Charlotte Fakeovers then it is possible that more damaging accusations could appear in the future.

Until they explain their position a cloud hangs over BBC Scotland and its cherished claims of impartiality and of adopting the highest of journalistic and ethical standards.

CLICK HERE for Charlotte Fakeovers on twitter